Playing the Waiting Game

Patience is a virtue. Yeah, I’ve heard that one before. Let’s just say that I’m not exactly the most patient person in the world–just ask some of the closest people to me. And I’m not necessarily proud of it. But in addition to the fact that I have to wait until April 1 to hear back from most of my colleges, Laptops for Egypt is in its own kind of waiting game right now. And the fact is that because I’m not raising money anymore (and now I’m doing totally different things–new post coming!) is teaching me a lesson in patience. After reading this, hopefully you’ll understand why they always say that patience is a virtue (it’s pretty darn hard to be patient while you’re waiting!).

Instead of complaining about how little you have and how much you have to wait, shift the focus to what you have already done or what you have around you. This is probably the most difficult point out of the three that I will blog about today. It’s so easy to sit around and complain about the fact that you have to wait another 39 days until you hear back from college (not like anyone’s counting, right?!?) or that you have to wait 120 days for the computers to be manufactured after the order is made in Shanghai. It’s SO EASY. But complaining, as much as it seems to be extremely helpful in the moment, actually does you no good. Think about it. Okay, so you’ve established that you have a lot of time to wait for something. Complaining about it all the time is really doing you ZERO good. In fact, it’s probably only getting you more and more irritated and it ends up turning into this huge vicious cycle. And then you’re constantly mad and you start complaining again. So instead of thinking about what you don’t have or what you’re waiting for, focus on the things that you’ve already done. Instead of thinking constantly about how much more waiting I have to do for the computers, I can use my time more wisely in doing the things I need to be doing for this project, and reflecting on what I did (and all the time and energy and hard work I have already put into it). You’ll start to feel better and realize that all you did had a purpose, even though you’re playing the waiting game right now. Or, instead of realizing that you’re playing the waiting game when it comes to college, realize that the work and stress of applying is now out of your hands and out of your control. What’s done is done. You couldn’t have done anything more on those essays. You couldn’t have done anymore extracurricular activities. It’s time to realize that our work is done (or at least has shifted into a new kind of work) and that the remainder of what we await is not in our own control. Honestly, that should feel a little more uplifting as you realize that you’re not expected to have done anymore. 

Hopefully, this took the burden off your shoulders just a little bit when you assess your particular situation in your own life. 

–Sarah Naguib

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Categories: Uncategorized | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “Playing the Waiting Game

  1. Greetings from California! I’m bored at work so I decided to check out your blog on my iphone during lunch break. I really like the information you present here and can’t wait to take a
    look when I get home. I’m amazed at how quick your blog loaded on my cell phone .. I’m not even
    using WIFI, just 3G .. Anyhow, awesome blog!

  2. Sherif

    Which OLPC laptops were ordered?

    • We ordered the most recent OLPC laptops available, which are the 4.0’s. They have touch screens and are overall really technologically advanced! If you have any more questions, please feel free to let me know.
      –Sarah Naguib

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